At-lp 60 Vs 120

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by Franco Robles, Mar 19, 2015.

  1. Franco Robles

    Franco Robles Moderator

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    I have the audio technica AT-LP 60, it's a great turntable, but I'm looking to upgrade. I want to upgrade into something more professional, sturdier, and reliable. I've been reading about the AT-LP 120, do you guys happen to know if there is a big difference between the 60 model, and the 120?
    I've been reading online, but I would like to hear from the community :)
     
  2. Benjamin Dashley

    Benjamin Dashley #NotMyModerator

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    The 120 is well worth the extra cash. I started off with a 60, which broke after a few moves (including one cross country). Then I bought this crappy little thing from Bed Bath and Beyond. I'd rather not talk about it. Haha.

    But I decided to pony up the cash for a 120 about a year ago and I am so pleased with it.

    It's a little more... manual than the 60. There's no auto-return or button to press that starts the record on its own. But a little more work comes with a ton of extra features. You can adjust the tracking weight when you get a new cartridge (the AT Green it comes with is fine, but I'm always looking for small upgrades), you can adjust the speed up to 20 percent (on top of the standard 33/45/78 speeds) and you have the option of using the included pre-amp or flipping a switch and using your own.

    It's bigger and might not be as pretty as, say, the ProJect Carbon or the U-Turn Models. But it's a solid mid-range investment (not as pure/fancy as audiophile equipment; not as crappy as some entry-level stuff). And it allows for so much customization. It's also direct-drive. Probably doesn't matter much to most, but after having two belt-drive models, I got tired of replacing the belts.

    Also, Wirecutter says it's the best for casual listening.

    Hope this helps!
     
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  3. DavidA

    DavidA The sun's not yellow, it's chicken

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    Go with the 120. I had the 60 and I always felt that it was never running at the correct speed. Just too fast and what not. The belts never felt dependable. The 120 is basically a rip of the Technics 1200 which is quite a beloved turntable. Especially for DJ's. I got a Shure m97xe cartridge and I'm quite content with my set up. Also, it has a built in pre-amp that you can turn off.
     
  4. Franco Robles

    Franco Robles Moderator

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    Yeah I think i'm gonna go get the 120 one of these days. Is there a significant difference in sound quality?
     
  5. Corycm

    Corycm Well-Known Member

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    Worth noting, the AT-120 uses a standard 1/2" cart (I think it ships with an AT95E green, like Benjamin said above), where the AT-60 doesn't have a replaceable cart, just the stylus. The -120 also has a tonearm with an adjustable weight, which I don't believe the -60 has. If you're a tinkerer or play a lot of less-than perfect records, this can come in handy (required if you're swapping carts) along with the anti-skate setting on the -120. The -60 only plays 33/45, the -120 plays 78 as well, which may or may not be a big deal, depending on what your collection looks like.

    The -120 is significantly heavier as well, as a whole. If I had to guess, I'd estimate easily twice as heavy and then some. I haven't weighed it, but it's close in weight to what my receiver weighs. the -60 I played with (briefly) was pretty lightweight.

    Weird dumb thing: The -120 has better feet, in my opinion. I know it sounds dumb, but I feel like between the weight and the feet it sits a bit more solidly - decidedly so if you're sitting it on a less-than-perfect surface.

    Just because a lot of people seem to be thinking about these two, that's my $0.02.
     
  6. Benjamin Dashley

    Benjamin Dashley #NotMyModerator

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    Oh man. Yes, it is so heavy. I was trying to fix a problem with my receiver today and moved it around and woof. Very heavy. But you're probably not going to move it much once it's in place.
     
  7. Benjamin Dashley

    Benjamin Dashley #NotMyModerator

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    And, in terms of sound quality, there are so many variables that go into that. I upgraded my cartridge today and that changed it drastically. And it could be different with your speakers, your receiver, etc. The good thing about the 120 is that it's easily upgrade-able. I had very little difficulty changing the cartridge. It's worth it just for that.
     
  8. Corycm

    Corycm Well-Known Member

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    I had to look it up to make sure I wasn't losing my mind. Yeah - significant weight difference.
    AT-60 weighs in at a svelte 6.6lbs, the AT-120 tips the scales at 23.5lbs.
     
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  9. DavidA

    DavidA The sun's not yellow, it's chicken

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    It's a battle-tank. And it's mighty pretty, IMHO.
     
  10. MaxPGH

    MaxPGH Well-Known Member

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    I've read several reports of the at-60 literally stripping the grooves of the vinyl and people finding that the lack of a counterweight leads to the needle to tearing up the grooves. As for the at-120, it's what I have an I'm relativly happy with it, however my anti-skate seems to be completely shot after using it for about two months (not sure it was ever working properly) which causes the occasional needle jump when I move around too much due to the needle sitting on the edge of the groove.
     
  11. Franco Robles

    Franco Robles Moderator

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  12. Benjamin Dashley

    Benjamin Dashley #NotMyModerator

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  13. MaxPGH

    MaxPGH Well-Known Member

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    They used to be the same price, but the black ones went out of stock for about a month around christmas and returned with the $50 price diference. I'm assuming its retailers jacking the price up due to low supply, high demand
     
  14. Bryce

    Bryce Member

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    Is this a super common problem or just a couple isolated incidents? How would one prevent this from occurring?
     
  15. Luke Maguire

    Luke Maguire Active Member

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    My two cents: I've had the LP60 for a year and a half now, and it's a solid turntable for the price. The only problem I have with it is that sometimes the speed feels off to me, and so some albums play a little fast (only with some albums, so I'm not sure if it's the turntable or the albums themselves), but other than that, I get good sound. As for the stripping of grooves, that seems like a pretty severe and noticeable problem, but I definitely think those are isolated incidents. I would not let it dissuade you from buying LP60 if you aren't willing to spend the money on the LP120. I think Audio-Technica builds better products than those that would damage vinyl. My vinyl has in no way degraded from being played on my turntable. I really think the LP60 is the best turntable for under $100.
     
  16. MaxPGH

    MaxPGH Well-Known Member

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    This is just in a few reviews I've read online. I mean the science behind it makes sense, I think I read the tonearm weight applied to the record on an AT-LP 60 is something outrageous like 6 grams or something like that? Maybe I'm pulling that out of my ass because I can't recall where I got that number from?
     
  17. Bryce

    Bryce Member

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    I already have the AT LP-60 (which I got for Christmas last year), but it seemed like a good beginner table from the reviews I read. I just never heard of it destroying the grooves of records, and when I hear one bad review I suddenly expect all the worst to happen to me. hahah But I haven't had any problems with it so far and I wasn't sure if the groove destruction was something that was common or happened with time or what.
     
  18. Corycm

    Corycm Well-Known Member

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    Someone get a force gauge under one of those LP-60s. Because I'm actually kinda curious. And a Crosley too. Again, totally curious.
     
  19. TimmahTao

    TimmahTao Well-Known Member

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    Crosley's at about 5.5-6g, if I recall. LP-60 is around 3g? Still not great?

    The LP-60 is designed as an introductory low-level consumer model turntable. It's not meant for critical or serious listening of any kind. It is really meant for people trying out vinyl for the first time who mainly albums to hang on their wall and only listen socially. The cartridge is not removable or upgradable, and the tonearm is non-adjustable.

    The LP-120 is a big improvement mechanically, and looks like a pro-sumer turntable, but isn't. The pre-amp is built in, and unable to be bypassed. Even if you turn the preamp off, the signal path is routed through the board and interference is introduced. If you have it plugged into the home theater in a box you bought at Best Buy, or a pair of computer speakers, you'll probably never notice or care. If you spent some time, care, and money building a system that is just the way you like to listen to it, you probably would notice the weaknesses and be bothered by them.
     
  20. Mike Keene

    Mike Keene Active Member

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    My son has an LP-60, and I have an LP-120. I prefer the direct drive on the LP-120 to the belt drive, (I replaced a different Gemini belt drive model which kept slipping belts on me). My receiver is a '90s generic with no phono input, and my speaker system is a Sony speaker bar to tie in to my tv. So, NOT audiophile by ANY stretch, but it gets the job done.

    The LP-60 has been fine, havent noticed any damage to vinyl. The belt needs to be untwisted every once in a while.
     

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