Hidden Gems

Discussion in 'General Music and Vinyl' started by Skalap, Oct 15, 2018.

  1. Skalap

    Skalap Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,836
    Likes:
    8,572
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2017
    Location:
    Paris
    Hey,

    Here is a space to share the most incredible records you know. The VMP Crate Digger Subscription thread is full of great album suggestions of many genre, many countries and many decades. The idea here is to explain why a particular album is so important and in which aspects it is. It can be important for political or cultural reasons, it can be important because it changed the way of music or created new ways of making music, it can be important because it is the unlikely meeting of two giants, because it is something we thought it was lost, etc... It can be from any country, any decade, any genre. Nobody will be judging.

    It would be nice to limit ourselves to one album per week. We certainly have a lot of albums that we want to share but sharing a lot of albums at the same time wouldn't help other Forum users to discover them nor give them time to really listen to it.


    Artist Name / Album Name
    Year / Country / Genre

    Introduction:

    Why you should listen to this album:

    Youtube / Spotify / ... link to hear the album

    Here are some reviews in English:
    List some reviews for this album or about the artist

    If you like this record, here is something more :
    List other records from the same artist/band and/or country and/or genre to listen after.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2018
    Nathaniel D., bfly, panino and 10 others like this.
  2. Skalap

    Skalap Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,836
    Likes:
    8,572
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2017
    Location:
    Paris
    List 2/2
     
  3. Skalap

    Skalap Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,836
    Likes:
    8,572
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2017
    Location:
    Paris
    José Cid / 10 000 Anos Depois Entre Vénus e Marte
    1978 / Portugal / Prog-Rock

    Introduction:
    If you’re in the habit of checking out sample credits on hip-hop albums you might have noticed two lesser-known names on Jay-Z’s ‘Marcy Me’ from his latest studio LP 4:44; one of the songs sampled, ‘Todo O Mundo E Ninguém’, is a single from the Portuguese psych/prog band Quarteto 1111, a short-lived yet incredibly influential project led by singer and multi-instrumentalist José Cid — a man whose fingers have always been in many musical pies simultaneously. This concept album is based in the destruction of the Earth by the mankind. 10.000 years after mankind's self-destruction, a man and a woman travelling in space return to Earth to repopulate it. The tone of the lyrics is of contemplation over mankind's past mistakes and future hopes. In this Album we can find influences by bands Like The Moody Blues and Pink Floyd. The translation of the album's name is "10,000 Years Later Between Venus and Mars". According to Billboard, this album is one of the 100 best Prog Rock albums ever recorded and, for the most of critics, is the best album ever recorded in Portugal.

    Why you should listen to this album:
    1977, Portugal is a 3 years old democracy and José Cid is a television and radio star when he told his label that he wanted to release a Prog-Rock album influenced by King Crimson or Pink Floyd. Orfeu, the label, told him that it was something impossible, that nobody would buy the record nor listen too. To convince the label, José Cid accepted to not receive royalties. The album got recorded (at the time he was the owner of one of the three Moog that you could find in all Portugal) and pressed in a beautiful gatefold sleeve with full color booklet (with nice sci-fi artwork and lyrics). Unfortunately, Orfeu was right, the record got 3000 copies pressed but only 500 to 1000 were sold at the time. José Cid stopped Prog-Rock and focused on a cheesy popular music. Though, among the years, 10000 anos depois entre Vénus e Marte achieves the status of a cult album, selling for hundred of dollars on Discogs (one copy sold $11000 according to some Website) and is finally recognized, even in Portugal, as one of the greatest (if not the greatest) record ever made in Portugal.



    Here are some reviews in English:
    Prog Archives
    Sputnik Music
    The 405

    If you like this record, here is something more :
    Quarteto 1111 - Onde, Quando, Como, Porquê, Cantamos Pessoas Vivas (1976)
    Tantra - Mistérios e Maravilhas (1977)
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2018
  4. wallystripes

    wallystripes Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Likes:
    3,018
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Location:
    Mexico City
    Wow, this thread is an awesome idea! That aldum has been added to my listenint queu ;)

    I'd like to share an album with you guys, I just have a formating question. How do you insert a link but have the actual link be a text other than the URL? I have no idea how to do that ):
     
  5. Skalap

    Skalap Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,836
    Likes:
    8,572
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2017
    Location:
    Paris
    Highlight the text and use the hyperlink button
    upload_2018-10-15_16-17-41.png
     
    AnthonyI and Darin Star Boogie like this.
  6. wallystripes

    wallystripes Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Likes:
    3,018
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Location:
    Mexico City
    I love the idea of this thread! Shoutout to @Skalap. I'll give it a go with an album I suggested at the Crate Digger Thread. It is an album I love and I'm sure people would like it if they gave it the chance.

    Camarón (AKA Camarón de La Isla)/La leyenda del tiempo

    1979/Spain/Flamenco

    Introduction:

    Flamenco is a centuries-old art form. After settling in Southern Spain, the gypsies blended their culture with the local music and that of the north of Africa, giving birth to the genre. Flamenco is a music largely born out of opresion and marginalization. The Romani people were persecuted and abused for centuries, and scars of this racism can still be felt today. Just like America has adopted African-American music as an important part of the national culture while racial segregation is still a big issue, the Spaniards adopted Flamenco as a matter of national pride while gypsies aren't fully integrated to the general culture. Then came Camarón, who had the sucess no other artist in the genre ever had, bridging in a way the gypsy and payo (non-gypsy) cultures, both musically and in terms of audiences.

    Why you should listen to this album:
    When Camarón recorded this album in the late 70's, he was a huge star in the genre already. He mastered the ancient forms of Flamenco and took them to the biggest audiences the genre ever had. However, this 1979 release was a shock no one was prepared for. The album incorporated elements of progressive rock, jazz, and Middle-Mastern music, relying heavily on an instrumental palette Flamenco had never heard of. Several songs in the album are adaptations of poems by Federico García Lorca, matching the unbeatable singing of Camarón and virtuosic instrumental playing with lyrics that are just as unique and esotheric. Just like the Sapaniards had appropriated the music of the Romani people, Camarón took non-gypsy music and made it part of his art. It was an artistic statement like the genre had never seen before. The album was a commercial flop at release, being heavily bashed by the Flamenco community for betraying the traditional instrumentation of the genre. Several record store owners reported that most buyers returned the album just a couple of days after purchasing it claiming it wasn't Flamenco. The album has acquired a cult status ever since, being cited by many as the most influential recording ever made in the genre. The fusion of genres pioneered by Camarón has become increasingly common, yielding artists like present-day Rosalía.



    Here are some reviews in English:

    https://worldmusiccentral.org/2014/12/11/la-leyenda-del-tiempo-a-flamenco-milestone/

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/obituary-camaron-de-la-isla-1531654.html

    If you like this record, here is something more :

    Camarón/Como el agua
    Enrique Morente/Despegando
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2018
  7. Skalap

    Skalap Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,836
    Likes:
    8,572
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2017
    Location:
    Paris
    Listening right now. Thanks!
     
  8. waitressboy

    waitressboy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,273
    Likes:
    4,426
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2017
    Location:
    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Ohhhhh I want to play this! The texts won't be very good because of my tarzanesque English, but I'm gonna do it anyway, I have a couple of albums in mind that I want everybody to listen to.
     
  9. Skalap

    Skalap Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,836
    Likes:
    8,572
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2017
    Location:
    Paris
    I ended quoting come other pages to "write" the introduction so don't be afraid and do the same. It's all about music and how you cherish these secret albums.
     
  10. waitressboy

    waitressboy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,273
    Likes:
    4,426
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2017
    Location:
    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Ariel Ramírez y Los Fronterizos - Misa Criolla
    1965 - Argentina - Folk music/Religious music (maybe?)

    [​IMG]

    Note: There are SO MANY versions of Misa Criolla. I just decided to go with the original one, but I prefer the version that Mercedes Sosa recorded in 2000. But I want to talk about Sosa with another album so I won't repeat artist.

    Introduction:
    Ariel Ramírez is perhaps one of the most important musicians in Argentina in the 20th century. He wrote lots of famous songs, and he was really interested in making folk music famous. The story goes that in the 50s, when he wasn't famous yet, he went to a convent in Germany and he met two nuns who told him that the convent used to be a nazi concentration camp and that they used to help the prisioners even when that was forbidden and punished with death. He was so impressed that he decided to make a work about religious faith, but he wasn't sure how to do something original. Years went by, he returned to Argentina and then he had the idea to write a mass with folkloric rhythms, arrangements and instruments. The lyrics are the exact same lyrics that are repeated on a mass; what changes is the music.
    The b side of the album is pure argentinian folcloric music, with lyrics with religious topics (the birth of Jesus, the scene of the angel visiting Maria to tell her she was pregnant, the three magi, etc.).

    Why you should listen to this album:
    Because it is beautiful and strange at the same time. It's been said that it shouldn't be considered as a religious piece of music, despite being a mass. And that's true, because it's not. Wait til the end of "Gloria" to listen a carnavalito or "Credo" turned into a chacarera. It shouldn't work. But it does.
    And it's a huge piece of work in Argentina. Everybody had listened the "Kyrie", I think it's more recognizable that version than the original, religious one.

    Youtube / Spotify / ... link to hear the album
    Spotify
    YouTube

    Here are some reviews in English:
    A little paragraph about this piece on Wikipedia

    If you like this record, here is something more:
    Uhm. I cannot recommend anything here. I mean, there are millions of folcloric albums. And there are bazillions of religious music. But both at the same time... Probably it exists. I have to find it yet.
    Well, you can check Mercedes Sosa's version. Or Zamba Quipildor's version, but that one is not on Spotify...
    Edit: yeah, definitely check Sosa's version:
     
    NateOEB, Skalap, lee newman and 4 others like this.
  11. Selaws

    Selaws Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    123
    Likes:
    476
    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Location:
    London, UK
    This thread is a great idea, totally my kind of music. Rather than narrow my list to random artists I will start with a specific country (I could do this for a few). Lets start with music from the Philippines and/or Filipino artists.

    The Third Wave

    https://www.discogs.com/Third-Wave-Questions-6768-Love-Train/release/5627068

    The Third Wave was a collection of filipino sisters from San Francisco (although the single in the link, as well as their album, were recorded in Germany whilst on tour). They are a great Jazz vocal group and original pressings of their album are quite sought after, and even more so the singles (they rarely pop up on discogs). I would recommend listening to Love-Train, its a great funky song.




    Dakila

    https://www.discogs.com/artist/399841-Dakila

    Dakila are again a San Francisco based jazz/funk/rock group. What sets them apart from many of the others is that they perform their songs in Tagalog, the national language of the Philippines. The band were even set to perform in the Philippines capital, Manila, in 1972 until it was cancelled following the announcement of martial law. The band are still together today and regularly perform. I would recommend the song Makibaka/Ikalat (fight/spread) as it shows all their styles over one song, the funk, rock, etc.




    Blackbuster

    https://www.discogs.com/artist/905322-Black-Buster

    Blackbuster were a 1970's funk/pop group from the Philippines. They released several albums, many of which can still be found for a relatively low price on discogs. They were relatively well known/popular in the Philippines but never broke out into any other countries in quite the same way. I had a quick look on youtube to try and provide a link but the only album of theirs I could find was 'Salsa'.




    Please

    https://www.discogs.com/artist/24118-Please

    Perhaps the most funky out of my list, Please were a Filipino group that recorded in Germany. They're a great band which clearly liked to have fun (check out the album cover for 'Manila Thriller'). I would definitely recommend their self titled album, specifically the track 'Grand Dad's Goin' Funky'.




    I wont go on too much more now but theres a load of Filipino artists who are worth checking out so if you like what I have suggested and find some others please let me know. Flip Nunez and Joe Baatan are also worth checking out if you want to dive a bit deeper.

    Sorry if the links are not formatted too well, its my first time using this type of system.
     
  12. Skalap

    Skalap Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,836
    Likes:
    8,572
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2017
    Location:
    Paris
    Thank you for sharing these gems! It's probably the first time I listen to music created by Filipinos! Would you recommend one album particularly? Even if it's good to have this variety of artists, the idea is to focus on one album (see previous sharing) so if you have any suggestion, I'll add the album you'll tell me to the list. Thank you again :)
     
    Nathaniel D. and Selaws like this.
  13. Selaws

    Selaws Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    123
    Likes:
    476
    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Location:
    London, UK
    Oh, sorry about that. Well in that case I will recommend the 'Dakila' self titled for the fact they sing in Tagalog, which is quite unique.

    https://www.discogs.com/artist/399841-Dakila
     
    Nathaniel D. and Skalap like this.
  14. Skalap

    Skalap Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,836
    Likes:
    8,572
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2017
    Location:
    Paris
    Thanks! And no worries, the important here is to share ;)
     
    Nathaniel D. and Selaws like this.
  15. Selaws

    Selaws Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    123
    Likes:
    476
    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Location:
    London, UK
    Perfect. I have multiple other suggestions but will wait until next week to break them up a bit.
     
    Nathaniel D. and Skalap like this.
  16. Stephen

    Stephen Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    762
    Likes:
    1,445
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2015
    Fun thread, i'll definitely be checking these out!

    One of my favorite gems is Little Beaver - Party Down

    It is fairly heavily sampled in hip hop, especially the classic O.S.T. by People Under the Stairs.

    The title track is maybe the greatest party banger of all time? The whole album is essential feel good party music.

     
  17. waitressboy

    waitressboy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,273
    Likes:
    4,426
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2017
    Location:
    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Liliana Felipe - El Hábito
    2002 / Mexico / Cabaret

    [​IMG]

    Introduction:
    Liliana Felipe was born in Argentina but because of the dictatorship in the 70s she moved to Mexico and she's been living there since that time. She's a feminist, she's a lesbian, she's an atheist, she's a leftist, and she writes cabaret songs about those topics. The curious thing is that she's been doing music since the end of the 70s (she was on tour in Perú I think when her parents called her to tell her not to come back to Argentina because the military were looking for her -they had already kidnapped her sister, who is a disappeared-) but it was just in the beginning of the 2000 when she became sort of famous in Argentina, because of this album. After this one, she released a fundamental live album, two albums of tango, another cabaret album and two conceptual albums.

    Why you should listen to this album:
    El Hábito is, actually, a compilation, but man what a compilation. It contains the songs from four albums, from a time lapse of ten years. It's incredible that it still sounds like a whole album. It's true that a big strength of this album lies on the lyrics. Felipe talks about feminism ("Oh Segismund, your hand doesn't reach the clitorian orgasm"), religion ("When I'm 80 I'll steal the alms from the church and I'll f*ck the altar boy"), but mostly, LOVE. And this album contains her best love songs. "What a thing love is, a relative of the pain" says in "A nadie" and that gives you an idea of her view of love: something that hurts you and heals you at the same time. But she sings in this mexican cabaret way, a mix of romantic and sensual style that will make you shake your hips and dance around the house.

    Youtube / Spotify / ... link to hear the album
    Somebody made a playlist with the songs on YouTube and it's the only way to listen to it AFAIK.

    Here are some reviews in English:
    I seriously doubt there are some reviews of this on English...

    If you like this record, here is something more :
    Well, if you liked this album, you should check her other albums, mainly "Lilith", "Trucho" and "Tan gachos".
    And also check Eugenia León. She sings this incredible song that Liliana wrote, "Sola en el pozo". It means "Alone in the well" and its first line, the long line that you'll hear, is "I am going to die". Never fails to give me chills.
     
    Kris, Skalap and lee newman like this.
  18. Nathan Guzman

    Nathan Guzman New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes:
    2
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2018
    Location:
    california
    Hello! new to the forum and i wasnt sure where to post this but as a staple of Brazilian music this album is in desperate need of a reissue. A little info and link to the opening track below. Getting a reissue is currently at 80$





    In 1963 Milton Nascimento moved from Três Pontas, in the midlands of the state of Minas Gerais, to the capital Belo Horizonte, looking for work. He settled at the Levy building, where the Borges Family, including Márcio Borges, already lived. Milton and Márcio started composing (Milton had already played in some bars of Belo Horizonte): Márcio wrote the lyrics, and Milton wrote the music. Ever since, Márcio has played an important role in the history of Clube de Esquina as a lyricist, mainly together with, at a later stage, Fernando Brant.

    In 1972, the first LP was recorded for EMI, Clube da Esquina. It was a double LP and had a youth group, and it attracted attention because of its engaging compositions, its patchwork of sounds, and its poetic richness. The group wrote a part of one of the most important chapters in the history of Brazilian popular music. It drew the attention of musicians from Brazil and abroad with its artistic daring and innovative creativity.

    At the time, critics lacked the ability to understand what was happening and made harsh comments about the work. But the album had soon won international recognition and prestige in Brazil. The album and its creators became the head of a network musicians around the world, making it a benchmark of style and aesthetics in contemporary music.

    It was followed by another album in 1978 (Clube da Esquina 2), which contained tracks written by artists who were not part of the original group (such as Chico Buarque).
     
    Skalap and lee newman like this.
  19. waitressboy

    waitressboy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,273
    Likes:
    4,426
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2017
    Location:
    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Mercedes Sosa / Mercedes Sosa Interpreta Atahualpa Yupanqui
    1977 / Argentina / Folklore


    [​IMG]

    Introduction:
    What can I say about Mercedes Sosa? She is THE voice of Latin America. Her voice is the voice of the continent, and her songs are the songs of all the people who live down here. When you listen to her, you feel such warmth.
    She used to sing folk songs, but her approach was different: she wanted to sing songs from young songwriters, and the topics of the songs on her repetoir were social topics.

    Why you should listen to this album:
    In 1976 the military dictatorship in Argentina banned her (in 1978 she had to leave the country and moved to Europe). Still, she recorded this album. Atahualpa Yupanqui is perhaps the most famous and conventional songwriter of folk music in Argentina. So the mix is impressive: a perfect songwriting with an amazing voice. The only instruments are guitar, percussion, and not much else.
    Needless to say, lyrics are a huge part of the beauty in this album. Yupanqui's music was not something that I liked when he was singing, but I would kill a nun if it's what it takes to write a song like his. For instance: "I spend the early mornings looking for a ray of light / why is the night so long? guitar, you tell me".
    If you want to listen ONE argentinian folk music, this is THE ONE.

    Oh, one more thing to give you an idea of how special it is: it was released on vinyl and cassette in the late 70s... and the first pressing on cd was on 2010, after Mercedes Sosa passed away. It's not impossible to find the original pressings of the album, but it really needs a good repress.

    Youtube / Spotify / ... link to hear the album


    If you like this record, here is something more:
    Atahualpa Yupanqui, of course. Though his singing is very different, when he's performing his songs they get a different depth.
     
    lee newman, Nathaniel D. and Skalap like this.

Share This Page