Record Changers Questions

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by Christine, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. Christine

    Christine Member

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    I have a 1961 WildCat record changer that plays 45 and 33 RPM records. It needs somethings fixed on it but I just don't have the money to be able to have much done on it. I'm guessing that there isn't away to get a new turntable to be a changer? A record player has to be built for such a thing, right? The only reason I'm asking is because it was something my mom suggested, but I told her that I didn't think it could be possible. It's a real shame because that was the reason I got the changer in the first place.
     
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  2. HiFi Guy

    HiFi Guy Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for the delayed response. Record changers haven't been manufactured since the early 80s. I believe BIC was the last company to make one. It was pretty bad- I know because I bought one in high school. I only used the single play spindle though.

    Dual and Technics made some really good changers in the '70s- so if you want something nice, I'd look there.

    In general though, I'd recommend a current single play turntable. There are good options available without breaking the bank.
     
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  3. Christine

    Christine Member

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    I am getting the audio technica record player, but I really want a changer to play my 45's on. That's really why I want the changer. I have a lot of 45's and it's a pain in the butt to play them on a single player turn table. Thanks for those suggestions. I was thinking of seeing if I could get a crosley changer; my thought on getting that was that Crosley still makes parts for them and it would be a lot cheeper to do it that way. Because with a record player from the 50's/ 60's it's more costly to try and keep it up, then if I were to get something that was made more recently.
    Does anyone know when Crosley started making the record changers; and, when they stopped making them? I tried to research it, but couldn't find anything.
     
  4. HiFi Guy

    HiFi Guy Well-Known Member

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    Not necessarily true. Lots of vintage models were high quality and built to last. Most need minimal maintenance. Today- lots of plastic on the low end, and not with repairing if (when) problems arise.
     
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  5. Christine

    Christine Member

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    Well, my changer is an emerson wildcat from I think, 1961, but another member suggested that Technics and another brand made good players as well.
    What some of the problems with my changer are:
    1. When playing a record, be it a 45 or 33, when the arm goes down to start playing, it doesn't start right at the beginning.
    2. The left speaker sounds as if it's blown, but it didn't sound this way until a while after I had gotten it.
    3. I hadn't used my changer in a while, and one day when I went to play some records; both speakers weren't working right and made the records not sound right. I tried both an album, and a 45 with the same outcome. I had the right speeds for both, but the speed wasn't the issue.
     
  6. Christine

    Christine Member

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    Hi, everyone,
    I am thinking about getting another record changer to replace the one I have now. Someone suggested I look at the Dual turntable and one other table. I was doing some research on another site, and what does everyone think of the Dual 229?
     
  7. HiFi Guy

    HiFi Guy Well-Known Member

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    The Dual 1229 is a nice turntable. They are fairly complex though- pay extra to get a nice one.
     
  8. Christine

    Christine Member

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    How are they complicated? How much would a, "nice" one be?
     
  9. HiFi Guy

    HiFi Guy Well-Known Member

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    Lots of levers/rods and such underneath to make everything work.

    The last completely restored one I saw was $750. You can find them in the $250-$300 range (still high due to inflated costs of retro/vintage gear) but I'm pretty certain that those will need work sooner or later.

    If I were in the market for a vintage Dual, I'd call Bill at Fixmydual.com as he always has a variety of restored models for sale.
     
  10. Christine

    Christine Member

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    Thanks for your reply. I live in Williamsburg Va and I don't know if there's anyone that can help me get one. I do know of this one place that restores players like this, but I don't know how much they do of selling players.
     

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